Photoset

psychoticpixiedreamgirl:

intlsugarbaby:

sugar-babe-kira:

european-sugar:

prostheticknowledge:

Creepface

Online image search tool and Chrome extension that claims to locate US sex offenders in it’s database with facial recognition analysis:

This Free online safety tool uses Facial Recognition to scan photos of Potential Dates, Coaches, Teachers and more… Check them all with CreepFace instantly!

Just Right Click and Select “Scan with CreepFace” to check any online photo against 475,000 Registered Sex Offenders in the U.S.

Facial Recognition powered by FacialNetwork.com

The Creepface online search engine can be found here

REBLOOOG

reblooogggggg!!!!!

Keep all the girls safe!
And stay safe girlies.

Reblog constantly!

again, i can see this being extremely useful for sex workers who perform irl sexual labour in a one on one setting

(via neoliberalismkills)

Tags: Gif
Quote
"I’m not scared of desperately uncool cultural reactionaries like Jack Thompson or anti-witchcraft Harry Potter burners. I’m scared of the people who do hold cultural power, who have the loud voice, who are, in fact, the cool kids, but think they’re embattled underdogs. I’m scared of the people who think that because disco was “taking over music” they had the right to “fight back” bullying and attacking disco performers and fans.

I’m scared of people who look at someone like Zoe Quinn, an individual who makes free indie games, or Anita Sarkeesian, an individual who makes free YouTube videos, and honestly think that these women are a powerful “corrupt” force taking away the freedom of the vast mob of angry young male gamers and the billion-dollar industry that endlessly caters to them, and that working to shut them up and drive them out somehow constitutes justice. The dominant demographic voice in some given fandom or scene feeling attacked by an influx of new, different fans and rallying the troops against “oppression” in reaction is not at all unique. It happens everywhere, all the time.

But let’s be honest: It’s usually guys doing it. Our various “culture wars” tend to boil down to one specific culture war, the one about men wanting to feel like Real Men and lashing out at the women who won’t let them. Whenever men feel like masculinity is under attack, men get dangerous. Because that’s exactly what masculinity teaches you to do, what masculinity is about. Defending yourself with disproportionate force against any loss of power? That’s what masculinity is."

Of Gamers, Gates, and Disco Demolition: The Roots of Reactionary Rage - The Daily Beast (via brutereason)

(via afro-dominicano)

Photoset

daniellemertina:

siphonmyanus:

a-break-in-time:

dynastylnoire:

A man tried to talk to a woman inside a Queens building lobby, then slashed her neck when she ignored him, according to police, who are now looking for the suspect.

The man, believed to be about 20 years old, approached the 26-year-old victim in the lobby of a Jamaica building after 5 a.m. on Oct. 1, police said. 

He tried talking to the woman and when she turned away, he grabbed her from behind and used some sort of cutting instrument to slash her neck, according to police. 

The victim was taken to the hospital, where she was listed in critical but stable condition. An aquaintance of the victim told NBC 4 New York that she is recovering, but that she suffered damage to her vocal chords.

Source

"Just ignore them"

You ladies need to start moving with bigger bags to hold switch blades

No, you men need to tell other men that they’re not entitled to us or our bodies.

Honestly, this situation is being framed as “woman got hurt for saying no to man” but this man would have been violent regardless no doubt. And I would not be surprised if more info was revealed about him and he had a history of violence against female exes (who at some point said yes) and other women.

Unfortunately, male violence is not merely triggered saying no to a man. It happens regardless of the choices a woman may or may not make because it’s derived from a severe sense of entitlement over women and disregard for women.

When we say she was murdered because she said no we set up the following argument that she should have “just said yes” instead of the idea that we have to attack male supremacist ideology which makes violence against women okay.

(Source: postracialcomments, via apollyween)

Tags: violence tw
Photo
humanoidhistory:

Behold the mantled guereza (Colobus guereza), aka the guereza, the eastern black-and-white colobus, or the Abyssinian black-and-white colobus, featured here on a vintage tobacco card. Here’s the original caption from the reverse side: “This specimen of the monkey family is remarkable for its solemn facial expression and its beautifully marked fur. It inhabits Abyssinia, the Galla Country and Somali-land. It lives in small troops, in the tallest trees it can find in the neighborhood of running water. It it restless and constantly on the move, but said hot to be noisy like most other members of the same family. It subsists mainly on various kinds of wild fruits, seeds and insects, and spends the whole day in collecting these, retiring to sleep high up in the trees. The Abyssinian soldiers use its fur to cover their shields.”
According to the more contemporary info at Wikipedia, the guereza ranges across much of west-central and east Africa, including Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Chad.
(New York Public Library)

humanoidhistory:

Behold the mantled guereza (Colobus guereza), aka the guereza, the eastern black-and-white colobus, or the Abyssinian black-and-white colobus, featured here on a vintage tobacco card. Here’s the original caption from the reverse side: “This specimen of the monkey family is remarkable for its solemn facial expression and its beautifully marked fur. It inhabits Abyssinia, the Galla Country and Somali-land. It lives in small troops, in the tallest trees it can find in the neighborhood of running water. It it restless and constantly on the move, but said hot to be noisy like most other members of the same family. It subsists mainly on various kinds of wild fruits, seeds and insects, and spends the whole day in collecting these, retiring to sleep high up in the trees. The Abyssinian soldiers use its fur to cover their shields.”

According to the more contemporary info at Wikipedia, the guereza ranges across much of west-central and east Africa, including CameroonEquatorial GuineaNigeriaEthiopiaKenyaTanzaniaUgandaand Chad.

(New York Public Library)

(via scinerds)

Photoset

thingsondesk:

Charlie and the Bryophyte Factory

Charlie here has been working on this awesome project I totally stumbled upon while opening a lab for him recently.  He and Curator Dr. Matt Von Konrat have been working to try to bring bryophyte specimens back to life and so far it seems to be going well!

It all started when Canadian biologist Dr. Catherine La Farge published a study regarding the reviving of a 400 year old moss collected from Antarctica!
http://www.sci-news.com/biology/article01112-400-year-old-plants-moss.html
So Matt thought, why not try that with some of our specimens here!  If this proves to be a productive experiment, this could potentially mean that we could bring back some of our more important specimens and study them as living organisms and not as evidence of once living things.

Right now, Charlie is watering them with glass distilled water and they are being housed in a fancy temperature and light controlled environment to see if they can’t be maintained stable.  Hopefully in a few weeks, these guys can be moved onto a culture mediums to help them grow.

(via afro-dominicano)

Quote
"Some people will say that a woman being subordinate to a man is a “part of our culture”… So what is the point of culture… culture is really about preservation and continuity of people… culture does not make people; people make culture. So if it is in fact true that the full humanity of women is not our culture, then we MUST make it our culture"

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, TEDxEuston (x)

Why all arguments for oppression that say “it’s just a part of our culture” are full of shit. Love this!

(via owning-my-truth)

(via dorianthewellendowed)

Chat
  • People in 2000: Y2K is going to kill us all!
  • in 2001: Anthrax is going to kill us all!
  • in 2002: West Nile Virus is going to kill us all!
  • in 2003: Weapons of Mass Destruction are going to kill us all!
  • in 2004: SARS is going to kill us all!
  • in 2005: Bird Flu is going to kill us all!
  • in 2006: E. Coli is going to kill us all!
  • in 2007: Vaccines are going to kill us all
  • in 2008: The Bad Economy is going to kill us all!
  • in 2009: Swine Flu is going to kill us all!
  • in 2010: BP Oil is going to kill us all!
  • in 2011: Obamacare is going to kill us all!
  • In 2012: The end of the world is going to kill us all!
  • In 2013: North Korea is going to kill us all!
  • In 2014: Ebola is going to kill us all!
  • Me: Eh, it will work out
  • I'm more afraid of the police tbh.
Photoset

the-goddamazon:

theamericanavenger:

theamericanavenger:

Okay guys this is kinda important. GQ just came in the mail and for the first time in a long while it had a really important article…

I just sat here for like the last half hour reading this and I’m incredibly appalled at our justice system in regards to the military. The article interviews about 23 men who have all been sexually assaulted in some branch of the military. The PTSD from sexual assault in the military is more prevalent than PTSD from combat…

If you have a chance I suggest reading this article…and the title is a quote that one of the victims Doctor told him…

Hey guys! I’m very impressed and extremely happy to see this post gaining a lot of speed over the last few days! A few people have requested it, so i’ve gone ahead and scanned the pages of the article for those who want to read it, to read. 

So, here it is!

They released an online version of this article on their website a while back too. I think I cross-posted it to Facebook.

(via blackfemalescientist)

Tags: rape tw
Photo
socimages:

The folly of small sample sizes; using The Tortoise and The Hare to teach research methods.
Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal, by Zach Weiner.

socimages:

The folly of small sample sizes; using The Tortoise and The Hare to teach research methods.

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal, by Zach Weiner.

(via likeboned)

Photo
descentintotyranny:

Evo Morales has proved that socialism doesn’t damage economies
Bolivia’s re-elected president has dumbfounded critics in Washington, the World Bank and the IMF. There are lessons for Britain’s left here
Oct. 14 2014

The socialist Evo Morales, who yesterday was re-elected to serve a third term as president of Bolivia, has long been cast as a figure of fun by the media in the global north. Much like the now deceased Hugo Chávez, Morales is often depicted as a buffoonish populist whose flamboyant denouncements of the United States belie his incompetence. And so, reports of his landslide win inevitably focused on his announcement that it was “a victory for anti-imperialism”, as though anti-US sentiment is the only thing Morales has given to Bolivia in his eight years in government.
More likely, Morales’s enduring popularity is a result of his extraordinary socio-economic reforms, which – according to the New York Times – have transformed Bolivia from an “economic basket case” into a country that receives praise from such unlikely contenders as the World Bank and the IMF – an irony considering the country’s success is the result of the socialist administration casting off the recommendations of the IMF in the first place.
According to a report by the Centre for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) in Washington, “Bolivia has grown much faster over the last eight years than in any period over the past three and a half decades.” The benefits of such growth have been felt by the Bolivian people: under Morales, poverty has declined by 25% and extreme poverty has declined by 43%; social spending has increased by more than 45%; the real minimum wage has increased by 87.7%; and, perhaps unsurprisingly, the Economic Commission on Latin America and the Caribbean has praised Bolivia for being “one of the few countries that has reduced inequality”. In this respect, the re-election of Morales is really very simple: people like to be economically secure – so if you reduce poverty, they’ll probably vote for you.
It’s true that Morales has made enemies in the White House, but this is probably less to do with rhetoric than the fact that he consistently calls for the international legalisation of the coca leaf, which is chewed as part of Bolivian culture but can also be refined into cocaine (via a truly disgusting chemical process). Before Morales was first elected, the Telegraph reported: “Decriminalisation would probably increase supply of the leaf, which is processed into cocaine, providing drug traffickers with more of the profitable illicit substance.” In fact the opposite has happened – in the past two years, coca cultivation has been falling in Bolivia. This inconvenient fact is a source of great consternation to the US government, which has poured billions of dollars into its totally ineffective and highly militaristic war on drugs in Latin America. Morales has – accurately in my view – previously implied that the war on drugs is used by the US as an excuse to meddle in the region’s politics.
Having said this, it would be dishonest to argue that Morales’s tenure has been perfect. Earlier this year the Bolivian government drew criticism from human rights groups for reducing the legal working age to 10. But what most news outlets neglected to mention is that the government was responding to a campaign from the children’s trade union, Unatsbo, which sees the change in legislation as a first step to protecting Bolivia’s 850,000 working children from the exploitation that comes with clandestine employment. Although Bolivia has made massive strides in reducing poverty, more than a million of its citizens still live on 75p a day – a legacy of the excruciating poverty of Bolivia before Morales took office.
Nevertheless, Morales must make reducing the number of child workers a priority during his third term. Not doing so will be a serious failure of his progressive project. In terms of social reforms, Morales should heed recent calls from the public advocate of Bolivia, Rolando Villena, to legalise same-sex civil unions and pave the way for equal marriage. He should also follow the lead of Uruguay’s president, José Mujica, and completely liberalise abortion, which would be a good first step to tackling the country’s high rates of maternal mortality. And Morales must also address the criticism of indigenous leaders who accuse him of failing to honour his commitments to protect indigenous people and the environment.
But however Morales uses his third term, it’s clear that what he’s done already has been remarkable. He has defied the conventional wisdom that says leftwing policies damage economic growth, that working-class people can’t run successful economies, and that politics can’t be transformative – and he’s done all of this in the face of enormous political pressure from the IMF, the international business community and the US government. In the success of Morales, important political lessons can be found – and perhaps we could all do with learning them.

descentintotyranny:

Evo Morales has proved that socialism doesn’t damage economies

Bolivia’s re-elected president has dumbfounded critics in Washington, the World Bank and the IMF. There are lessons for Britain’s left here

Oct. 14 2014

The socialist Evo Morales, who yesterday was re-elected to serve a third term as president of Bolivia, has long been cast as a figure of fun by the media in the global north. Much like the now deceased Hugo Chávez, Morales is often depicted as a buffoonish populist whose flamboyant denouncements of the United States belie his incompetence. And so, reports of his landslide win inevitably focused on his announcement that it was “a victory for anti-imperialism”, as though anti-US sentiment is the only thing Morales has given to Bolivia in his eight years in government.

More likely, Morales’s enduring popularity is a result of his extraordinary socio-economic reforms, which – according to the New York Times – have transformed Bolivia from an “economic basket case” into a country that receives praise from such unlikely contenders as the World Bank and the IMF – an irony considering the country’s success is the result of the socialist administration casting off the recommendations of the IMF in the first place.

According to a report by the Centre for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) in Washington, “Bolivia has grown much faster over the last eight years than in any period over the past three and a half decades.” The benefits of such growth have been felt by the Bolivian people: under Morales, poverty has declined by 25% and extreme poverty has declined by 43%; social spending has increased by more than 45%; the real minimum wage has increased by 87.7%; and, perhaps unsurprisingly, the Economic Commission on Latin America and the Caribbean has praised Bolivia for being “one of the few countries that has reduced inequality”. In this respect, the re-election of Morales is really very simple: people like to be economically secure – so if you reduce poverty, they’ll probably vote for you.

It’s true that Morales has made enemies in the White House, but this is probably less to do with rhetoric than the fact that he consistently calls for the international legalisation of the coca leaf, which is chewed as part of Bolivian culture but can also be refined into cocaine (via a truly disgusting chemical process). Before Morales was first elected, the Telegraph reported: “Decriminalisation would probably increase supply of the leaf, which is processed into cocaine, providing drug traffickers with more of the profitable illicit substance.” In fact the opposite has happened – in the past two years, coca cultivation has been falling in Bolivia. This inconvenient fact is a source of great consternation to the US government, which has poured billions of dollars into its totally ineffective and highly militaristic war on drugs in Latin America. Morales has – accurately in my view – previously implied that the war on drugs is used by the US as an excuse to meddle in the region’s politics.

Having said this, it would be dishonest to argue that Morales’s tenure has been perfect. Earlier this year the Bolivian government drew criticism from human rights groups for reducing the legal working age to 10. But what most news outlets neglected to mention is that the government was responding to a campaign from the children’s trade union, Unatsbo, which sees the change in legislation as a first step to protecting Bolivia’s 850,000 working children from the exploitation that comes with clandestine employment. Although Bolivia has made massive strides in reducing poverty, more than a million of its citizens still live on 75p a day – a legacy of the excruciating poverty of Bolivia before Morales took office.

Nevertheless, Morales must make reducing the number of child workers a priority during his third term. Not doing so will be a serious failure of his progressive project. In terms of social reforms, Morales should heed recent calls from the public advocate of Bolivia, Rolando Villena, to legalise same-sex civil unions and pave the way for equal marriage. He should also follow the lead of Uruguay’s president, José Mujica, and completely liberalise abortion, which would be a good first step to tackling the country’s high rates of maternal mortality. And Morales must also address the criticism of indigenous leaders who accuse him of failing to honour his commitments to protect indigenous people and the environment.

But however Morales uses his third term, it’s clear that what he’s done already has been remarkable. He has defied the conventional wisdom that says leftwing policies damage economic growth, that working-class people can’t run successful economies, and that politics can’t be transformative – and he’s done all of this in the face of enormous political pressure from the IMF, the international business community and the US government. In the success of Morales, important political lessons can be found – and perhaps we could all do with learning them.

(via dorianthewellendowed)

Tags: to read