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doctorswithoutborders:

Photo 2013 © Sven Torfinn
Right now, many major drug companies’ business practices keep their own profits high while keeping medicines out of the hands of millions of people who need them. Until we change the way medicines are developed and marketed, too many people will go without needed treatment because quality medicines are not available to them.SHARE THIS IMAGE to show you stand with Doctors Without Borders in calling for access to quality, affordable medical treatment for ALL.

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo 2013 © Sven Torfinn

Right now, many major drug companies’ business practices keep their own profits high while keeping medicines out of the hands of millions of people who need them. Until we change the way medicines are developed and marketed, too many people will go without needed treatment because quality medicines are not available to them.

SHARE THIS IMAGE to show you stand with Doctors Without Borders in calling for access to quality, affordable medical treatment for ALL.

(via bittergrapes)

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repair-her-armor:

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

Female Armor BINGO (downloadable PDF) by OzzieScribbler (yours truly)
As a special present for Bikini Armor Battle Damage first anniversary, I present to you: Female Armor BINGO!
Feel free to use as a reference to quantify how ridiculous any female armor is.
edit: Updated the link into downloadable PDF!
Breakdown of all the squares under the cut.
Read More

Oh, I know the followers of RHA will love this!

repair-her-armor:

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

Female Armor BINGO (downloadable PDF) by OzzieScribbler (yours truly)

As a special present for Bikini Armor Battle Damage first anniversary, I present to you: Female Armor BINGO!

Feel free to use as a reference to quantify how ridiculous any female armor is.

edit: Updated the link into downloadable PDF!

Breakdown of all the squares under the cut.

Read More

Oh, I know the followers of RHA will love this!

(via lareinaana)

Photoset

nprbooks:

Twenty-five years ago, on April 15, 1989, Chinese students were mourning the death of a reformist leader. But what began as mourning evolved into mass protests demanding democracy. Demonstrators remained in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, day after day, until their protests were brutally suppressed by the Chinese army — on June 4. Hundreds died; to this day, no one knows how many.

NPR’s Louisa Lim explores those events, the forgotten deaths and the Chinese government’s rewriting of the official narrative in a new book, The People’s Republic of Amnesia. Her story includes an investigation into a forgotten crackdown in the southwestern city of Chengdu — which, to this day, has never been reported.

Tang Deying holds her determination in the stubborn set of her jaw. This diminutive, disheveled, elderly woman shuffling into the room in her pink plastic flip-flops is one of the few living links to the crackdown in Chengdu during the summer of 1989.

When martial law troops opened fire on civilians in Beijing on June 4, 1989, the violence was beamed immediately into living rooms around the world. Yet it has taken a quarter-century for details to emerge of the deadly events in Chengdu that cost Tang’s 17-year-old son his life.

For 25 years, a single aim has driven Tang’s existence: seeking restitution and accountability for the death of her son, Zhou Guocong, who was fatally beaten in police custody after disappearing in the 1989 Chengdu crackdown.

"Right is right. Wrong is wrong," she told me firmly

See the rest of the story here.

Images courtesy Louisa Lim and Kim Nygaard

Link

fascinasians:

Paul Lo will be the nation's first Hmong American judge. (Photo credit: UCLA Daily Bruin)

Paul Lo will be the nation’s first Hmong American judge. (Photo credit: UCLA Daily Bruin)

Earlier this year, California Governor Jerry Brown made history when he appointed UCLA Law alumnus Paul Lo to the Merced County Superior Court Bench. Lo, who will be sworn in this Friday, will be the nation’s first Hmong American judge.

Said Karin Wang of Asian Americans Advancing Justice back in Januaryto the UCLA Daily Bruin:

“It is both historic and inspirational to have the nation’s first Hmong American judge in California’s Central Valley, which is home to one of the nation’s largest Hmong populations,” Wang said.

Merced currently has the fifth highest Hmong American population in the United States, according to the 2010 U.S. Census.

Lo immigrated to the United States in 1979 as a non-English speaking immigrant at age 11 as refugees from the Vietnam War. Lo’s family grew up poor and on welfare, but Lo was spurred by a high school teacher to pursue a career in law to help support the Hmong American community.

Lo was admitted to the State Bar of California in 1994 and has been a solo legal practitioner since 2003, according to State Bar records. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Davis and his law degree from the University of California at Los Angeles School of Law.

Lo spoke no English when he came to the United States at the age of 11, but eventually mastered the language, working hard through school, college and law school.

He said he appreciates the appointment’s historic relevance, but said it wouldn’t change “the person I am now.”

“I think a lot of people in the Hmong community are very proud of it, but I’m equally excited for the opportunity to serve this community, this town,” Lo said.

Lo’s appointment not only contributes to increasing diversity on the bench in California but also elevates a dedicated community advocate, who has devoted his life towards improving legal rights for Hmong Americans, an often over-looked and marginalized ethnic group within the Asian American community. Although Asian Americans remain underrepresented in state and federal judiciaries, Lo’s appointment is an important step forward.

“(Lo) provides needed diversity for our bench. Our bench is starting to look like the population,” said Judge Brian McCabe of the Merced County Superior Court, who worked with Lo as partners in the same firm.

“My true passion to go into law was to be an advocate for the Hmong community,” he said.

The public is invited to attend Lo’s swearing-in ceremony this Friday, which will take place at 4pm at the Art Kamanger Centre at the Merced Theatre, 301 Main St.

Text

lellyphant:

it’s funny that the only people who are accused of “breeding hate” are marginalized people calling out bigotry

bigots, on the other hand, are told how ~brave~ they are for not giving in to the ~liberal agenda~ or whatever

hmm…it’s almost like…”hate breeds hate” is just a silencing tactic…to use against marginalized people…

hmmmmmmmmmmmm

(via athousandchurches)

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awsickdude asked: One of my main characters is Korean-American, but I'm afraid of white-washing his ancestry or making him into a stereotypical caricature. So I was wondering if you had any resources about Korean culture, writing characters outside of my race, etc?

theroadpavedwithwords:

fixyourwritinghabits:

image

I swear, like clockwork, we get this question nearly every month. What is the secret to writing something different from me? There are no secrets, there is no guides, no quick lists of what all Korean-Americans are like (because no one works that way). Don’t treat characters like they’re some unfathomable other, because they’re not, they’re human beings like you and me and anyone else.

Why are you worried about writing a stereotypical caricature? Is it because that’s all you know? Change that. Consume media written by Korean-Americans, realize that being Korean-American will effect who he is just like your background effects who you are, and make sure your characters are human beings.

Worried about white-washing history? Read history. There’s lots of it out there, by Korean-Americans, and it’s easily accessible on the internet. Go to museums, check out books assigned in Asian American studies. They exist, you’re just not looking for them.

Stop being afraid of writing POC characters because “you might get it wrong.” Do type the questions you just asked me into google, and start from there. Do realize that your characters are human, share the same interests and motivations as everyone else, and should be treated as such. .

STANDING OVATION OVER HERE.

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(Source: SPITTACULAR, via swampmermaids)

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mineralists:

Malachite with Chrysocolla Partially polished Stalactite Congo

mineralists:

Malachite with Chrysocolla
Partially polished Stalactite
Congo

(via lareinaana)

Photoset

dynamicafrica:

In Photos: “Becoming South Sudan” by Alinka Echeverria (2011).

It’s been a little over three years since the four million voters from Africa’s youngest country voted in a referendum to secede from Sudan and create the Republic of South Sudan. January 9th, 2011, was the day that changed everything, the day history was made and the day the world’s 193rd nation was birthed. Exactly six months later on July 9th, 2011, South Sudan officially became a sovereign and independent nation.

However, less than five years later the country has found itself in an ongoing conflict as fighting between government forces and rebel armies (chiefly the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement - SPLM) continue to take place over resources and territory. Today, April 15th, marks exactly four months since the beginning of South Sudan’s current civil war. The war has so far displaced more than a million and killed over 10,000. UNICEF warns that the South Sudan conflict and famine could kill 50,000 children within months.

Read more about this photo series.

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s-c-i-guy:

Artificial blood ‘will be manufactured in factories’
It is the stuff of gothic science fiction: men in white coats in factories of blood and bones.

But the production of blood on an industrial scale could become a reality once a trial is conducted in which artificial blood made from human stem cells is tested in patients for the first time.


It is the latest breakthrough in scientists’ efforts to re-engineer the body, which have already resulted in the likes of 3d-printed bones and bionic limbs.


Marc Turner, the principal researcher in the £5 million programme funded by the Wellcome Trust, told The Telegraph that his team had made red blood cells fit for clinical transfusion.


Prof Turner has devised a technique to culture red blood cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells – cells that have been taken from humans and ‘rewound’ into stem cells. Biochemical conditions similar to those in the human body are then recreated to induce the iPS cells to mature into red blood cells – of the rare universal blood type O.
“Although similar research has been conducted elsewhere, this is the first time anybody has manufactured blood to the appropriate quality and safety standards for transfusion into a human being,” said Prof Turner.
There are plans in place for the trial to be concluded by late 2016 or early 2017, he said. It will most likely involve the treatment of three patients with Thalassaemia, a blood disorder requiring regular transfusions. The behaviour of the manufactured blood cells will then be monitored.
“The cells will be safe,” he said, adding that there are processes whereby cells can be removed.
The technique highlights the prospect of a limitless supply of manufactured type-O blood, free of disease and compatible with all patients.
“Although blood banks are well-stocked in the UK and transfusion has been largely safe since the Hepatitis B and HIV infections of the 1970s and 1980s, many parts of the world still have problems with transfusing blood,” said Prof Turner.
However, scaling up the process to meet demand will be a challenge, as Prof Turner’s laboratory conditions are not replicable on an industrial scale. “A single unit of blood contains a trillion red blood cells. There are 2 million units of blood transfused in the UK each year,” he said.
Currently, it costs approximately £120 to transfuse a single unit of blood. If Prof Turner’s technique is scaled up efficiently, it could substantially reduce costs.
Dr Ted Bianco, Director of Technology Transfer at the Wellcome Trust, said: “One should not underestimate the challenge of translating the science into routine procedures for the clinic. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the challenge Professor Turner and colleagues have set out to address, which is to replace the human blood donor as the source of supply for life-saving transfusions.”
For the moment, factories of blood remain the stuff of fiction.
source

s-c-i-guy:

Artificial blood ‘will be manufactured in factories’

It is the stuff of gothic science fiction: men in white coats in factories of blood and bones.

But the production of blood on an industrial scale could become a reality once a trial is conducted in which artificial blood made from human stem cells is tested in patients for the first time.

It is the latest breakthrough in scientists’ efforts to re-engineer the body, which have already resulted in the likes of 3d-printed bones and bionic limbs.

Marc Turner, the principal researcher in the £5 million programme funded by the Wellcome Trust, told The Telegraph that his team had made red blood cells fit for clinical transfusion.

Prof Turner has devised a technique to culture red blood cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells – cells that have been taken from humans and ‘rewound’ into stem cells. Biochemical conditions similar to those in the human body are then recreated to induce the iPS cells to mature into red blood cells – of the rare universal blood type O.

“Although similar research has been conducted elsewhere, this is the first time anybody has manufactured blood to the appropriate quality and safety standards for transfusion into a human being,” said Prof Turner.

There are plans in place for the trial to be concluded by late 2016 or early 2017, he said. It will most likely involve the treatment of three patients with Thalassaemia, a blood disorder requiring regular transfusions. The behaviour of the manufactured blood cells will then be monitored.

“The cells will be safe,” he said, adding that there are processes whereby cells can be removed.

The technique highlights the prospect of a limitless supply of manufactured type-O blood, free of disease and compatible with all patients.

“Although blood banks are well-stocked in the UK and transfusion has been largely safe since the Hepatitis B and HIV infections of the 1970s and 1980s, many parts of the world still have problems with transfusing blood,” said Prof Turner.

However, scaling up the process to meet demand will be a challenge, as Prof Turner’s laboratory conditions are not replicable on an industrial scale. “A single unit of blood contains a trillion red blood cells. There are 2 million units of blood transfused in the UK each year,” he said.

Currently, it costs approximately £120 to transfuse a single unit of blood. If Prof Turner’s technique is scaled up efficiently, it could substantially reduce costs.

Dr Ted Bianco, Director of Technology Transfer at the Wellcome Trust, said: “One should not underestimate the challenge of translating the science into routine procedures for the clinic. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the challenge Professor Turner and colleagues have set out to address, which is to replace the human blood donor as the source of supply for life-saving transfusions.”

For the moment, factories of blood remain the stuff of fiction.

source

(via kenobi-wan-obi)